Living with PSP, CBS or MSA

There are a number of conditions which look like Parkinson’s at first, but progress differently, and are actually a separate condition altogether.

Sometimes these conditions are referred to as “atypical Parkinson’s” or “Parkinson’s plus”. However, the way they progress and the way they affect people is very different to Parkinson’s.

PSP

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) is a rare condition affecting parts of the brain that control walking, eye movements, balance, speech and swallowing.

  • Progressive – means the symptoms get worse over time
  • Supranuclear – refers to the part of the brain that is affected
  • Palsy – means a weakness or paralysis in a part of the body

Currently there are no known treatments to cure PSP or ways to prevent it from occurring. Treatments, therapies and strategies are available to help people with PSP and their families and carers to make the most of living with the condition.

Other terms sometimes used to describe PSP are ‘Steele-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome’, ‘Richardson’s disease’, ‘Parkinson’s plus’, ‘PSP-parkinsonism’ (PSP-P) and ‘pure akinesia with gait freezing’.

CBS

Cortico Basal Syndrome (CBS) is most commonly caused by a disease called Cortico Basal Degeneration (CBD), but “Syndrome” is the preferred term.
It is a rare neurological (brain) condition which involves a gradual loss of brain cells in the areas of the brain that look after movement and thinking. CBS (CBD) is a progressive condition meaning that symptoms worsen over time.

  • Cortico Basal – refers to the parts of the brain affected. The cortex is the outer layer of the brain and the basal ganglia lies deeper in the brain.

Treatments and therapies are available to help manage symptoms of CBS, however there is no cure or ways to prevent it from occurring or slow its progression.

MSA

Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) is a rare neurological (brain) condition caused by a gradual loss and shrinkage of brain cells. This loss of cells occurs in the parts of the brain that control movement, balance and automatic functions of the body such as bladder and blood pressure.

  • Multiple – many (parts of the brain)
  • System – the brain structures that control different functions
  • Atrophy – cell shrinkage or damage

Treatments and therapies are available to help manage symptoms of MSA, however there is no cure or ways to prevent it from occurring or slow its progression.

Other terms sometimes used to describe MSA are ‘olivopontocerebellar atrophy’, ‘striatonigral degeneration’, ‘Parkinson’s plus’ and ‘Shy-Drager Syndrome’.

For more information on these conditions please call our InfoLine on 1800 644 189.

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